Rasulid Yemen on Youtube

suhaylrasulid

There are at least three Youtube sites in Arabic that talk about Yemen during the Rasulid period.  The first is a short description of the book ‘Adan fi ‘aṣr al-dawla al-Rasūliyya of Muḥammad Manṣūr ‘Alī Ba‘īd (2012), the second is a similar account of the book Al-Tamradāt al-Qabalīya fī ‘aṣr al-dawla al-Rasūlīya wa-athar-hā fī al-ḥayāt al-‘āmma (626-858 H) of Ṭahā Ḥusayn Hudayl, and the thirdis a chronological treatment of the Rasulid era on the channel Suhayl.

Modern South Arabian

johnstone

T.M. Johstone sits with Abdul Qadr,
the head of education in Dhofar at the time.

T.M. Johnstone’s Modern South Arabian recordings: collaborative cataloguing and ‘footprints’ of biocultural change in Southern Arabia

Audio cataloguer Dr Alice Rudge writes:

Thomas Muir Johnstone made many recordings during his research trips to the Middle East in the 1960s and 1970s, some of which are of endangered and unwritten languages. The British Library now houses these open reel and cassette tapes, which were acquired from Durham University Library in 1995. The collection is archived within the World and Traditional Music collection with the reference C733. As part of the Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, these tapes have now been digitised and are being catalogued. The cataloguing of the tapes in this collection containing Modern South Arabian languages was made possible through a collaborative process, which revealed not only the content of the tapes, but also the webs of intertwining stories and lives that they document.

For the rest of this article and the podcast, click here.

Charles Schmitz on AIYS

charles1
Charles Schmitz in Sanaa

by Charles Schmitz

I was lucky to arrive in Yemen during the optimistic period that followed unification. By 1993, Ali Salem al-Baydh had already absconded in Aden and the expulsion of Yemeni laborers from Saudi Arabia took a toll on the economy, but there was still a euphoria for the new liberal era.

At the time, AIYS in Safiya Shimaliya hosted a score of prominent researchers headed by Sheila Carapico. Sheila was hard at work on Civil Society composed on a laptop with no screen—as I remember, someone had rigged a big dusty desktop monitor to make do. Iris Glosemeyer meticulously collected newspaper articles on every prominent Yemeni political family and could recite the names of the mothers of the Members of Parliament, as well as their sons and granddaughters, by heart. Anna Wuerth was a regular fixture in family court and the court of AIYS’s mafraj gatherings. Eng Seng Ho appeared occasionally in from the Hadhramawt to boil lobsters (it took a long time in Sanaa’s high altitude) or fix a laptop. Resident Director David Warburton somehow managed to keep the place running. These scholars’ guidance and support were critical to my research in Yemen, and my gratitude to them and to AIYS led me to later serve AIYS in the hopes of providing a new generation of researchers the same supportive experience in Yemen.

I took up residence in al-Hawta, Lahj, to observe the reestablishment of property rights in agricultural land. Though completely rudderless, the Yemeni Socialist Party still controlled the south. Those with foresight in Lahj at the time were the Islahi activists in the rebuilt Ministry of Religious Endowments who were well prepared for their post-war reign of terror in al-Hauta. For comic relief, I would join the resident Abdali clan members whose stories of the socialist years in al-Hawta resembled Garcia Marquez’s surrealism. One of the Sultan’s relatives spent four years locked inside his house before finally emerging to join the socialist experiment in progress. My days in al-Hauta were interrupted by the Seventy Days War of 1994. Though we all had hoped the daily peace demonstrations would prevail, deployment of forces along the former border foreshadowed a different outcome. I flew out of Yemen seated on the rear door of a C-130.

By the time I returned to Yemen in 2001, AIYS had grown significantly thanks to Sheila Carapico and Mac Gibson’s work in the early nineties. AIYS indeed had operated on a shoestring for its early history (see Steve Caton’s t-shirts), but tired of running AIYS with student help from her office at the University of Richmond, Sheila applied for new grants that allowed AIYS to hire professional staff. In 1996 AIYS under Mac Gibson hired its first executive director, Ria Ellis, who ran AIYS from her palatial home office in Ardmore, PA.  Ria and her assistant, Joan Reilly, not only administered an expanded AIYS but also produced a spree of new publications, including much of the translations series by Lucine Taminian and Noha Sadek and Sam Leibhaber’s Diwan of Hajj Dakon.  In the early 2000s under Tom Stevenson’s watch, AIYS landed a Middle East Partnership Initiative grant for a permanent residence. Hired as resident director in 2000, Chris Edens undertook the arduous task of finding a permanent building. Chris not only found a well located and suitable building, but also oversaw its substantial reconstruction and the relocation of AIYS from the Bayt al-Hashem location.

Continue reading Charles Schmitz on AIYS

Philby in the Hadramawt

shebatitle

The British traveler H. St. J. Philby is best known for his writings on Saudi Arabia, but he also visited the Hadramawt in the late 1930s, driving down from Najrān through the eastern extent of the Empty Quarter to Shabwa and then into the Ḥaḍramawt. It is a chatty text like an extended diary, with names of people met and places visited, including archaeological ruins with inscriptions.  Philby has his bias, as is evident throughout, but the photographs are good documentation of life at the time.

philby336

philby18

Continue reading Philby in the Hadramawt

Sam Liebhaber on AIYS

sam1
Sam Liebhaber with Gregory Johnsen in Sanaa, 2004, having an evening cup of shay halib at Ali al-‘Imrani’s café in Sana’a, next to the Qubaat al-Mahdi, overlooking the Sayla.

by Sam Liebhaber

It is a daunting task for me to list the ways that the AIYS has guided and supported my research in Yemen; they are almost too many to count.  Indeed, my experience in learning about Yemen and developing proficiency in its languages is inseparable from my relationship to the AIYS, which has stood as one of the few constants in a changing – and often tumultuous – landscape.

My first encounter with the AIYS dates back to my earliest steps in learning Arabic at the beginning of my graduate career in 1998. I spent the summer studying Arabic at the Center for the Arabic Language and Eastern Studies (CALES) in the Old City of Sana’a and a colleague brought me to the AIYS, which at the time was located on al-Bawniya street.  During that summer, I spent many pleasant hours studying and reading about Yemen in the AIYS library – a lovely, glass-enclosed space that looked out onto a courtyard garden.

When I returned to Yemen the following year for further language study, I was once again welcomed to the AIYS by the resident director, Marta Colburn, who offered me guidance and advice on future research and studies in Yemen. On a side trip to Asmara in 2000, I befriended Bob Holman, New York-based poet/performer and founder of the Bowery Poetry Club, at a conference and cultural celebration marking Eritrean independence.  Bob was gathering information for his TV documentary, On the Road with Bob Holman, and when I told him about Yemen’s vibrant poetic culture, he returned back with me to Sana’a.  Marta Colburn graciously arranged for Bob and myself to attend the weekly gathering of literati in the home of Dr. Abd al-Aziz al-Maqalih, Yemen’s “poet laureate”, who was impressed by Bob’s extemporaneous composition and performance of a poem about the beauty and elegance of Sana’a.  This led to an offer to Bob and myself to translate Dr. Abd al-Aziz al-Maqalih’s Book of Sana’a – myself an Arabic neophyte and Bob a Nuyorican slam poet.  Marta Colburn wisely engaged a friend of hers, Muhammad Abd al-Salam Mansur, to help us with the translation.  Muhammad Abd al-Salam remains a close friend and served as a frequent mentor to me during my subsequent visits in Yemen.  After a few years of work, our translation of the Book of Sana’a was published in Yemen thanks to the effort and support of the AIYS, especially that of Christopher Edens who assumed the role of resident director after the departure of Marta Colburn and who oversaw the final editing and annotation of the Book of Sana’a.

Continue reading Sam Liebhaber on AIYS

Steve Caton on AIYS

stevenajwa279
Steve Caton (right) and Najwa Adra in al-Ahjur, February, 1979

by Steve Caton

In its early days, AIYS seemed to operate on a shoe-string budget. (Perhaps its officers would maintain that it still does so today.) And so its first resident director Jon Mandaville had to be entrepreneurial to make ends meet, and one of his money-making schemes was to sell t-shirts that had an image and “American Institute for Yemeni Studies” printed on the front. I believe this was sometime in 1980. I bought one. I only could afford to buy one because I too had a hard time making ends meet on my meager fellowship. I imagine my student colleagues in AIYS were not much better off financially, and so I wonder how big a money-maker the t-shirts were in the end.

aiysshirt

I’ve kept t-shirts over the years which I associate with different places I’ve been to, and this has amounted to quite a collection. When I rummage through my drawers to retrieve one, I pick a t-shirt that seems to fit my mood on that day. Even after they’ve gotten torn or faded, I continue to wear them, until I reluctantly consign their tatters to the scrap heap, where they have second lives as cleaning rags.

Continue reading Steve Caton on AIYS

مكانة المرأة اليمنية العظيمة في اليمن القديم

womanbustSouth Arabia alabaster bust of a woman,
1st century B.C.-1st century A.D.


مكانة المرأة اليمنية العظيمة في اليمن القديم

بقلم: حسني السيباني

لقد إرتبط إسم اليمن و تاريخه العريق بحضور و مشاركة دائمة و فعالة للمرأة اليمنية بشكلاً عام منذ 5 ألف سنة قبل الميلاد على أقل تقدير لنساء تلازمت أسمائهن بحقب من الإزدهار و العظمة من ” ملكة مملكة سبأ العظمى إلى شوف السبئية و من قبلها ألبها السبئية و طريفة الخير الحميرية و لميس بنت أسعد تبع الحميرية و برآت سيرة جاهلية ديمة من بيت رثدة القتبانية و صفنات الأبذلية الحميرية و أب صدوق القتبانية إلى الملكة أروى الصليحي و غيرهم الكثير و تتضح لنا مكانة المرأة و دورها الفعال في اليمن القديم من خلال النقوش القديمة و كذا ما ذكره المؤرخين و ما ذكرته الديانات السماوية و كذا أيضاً الأساطير و الحكايات .
_____________________________________________

 المكانة الإجتماعية للمرأة اليمنية قديماً

إن القول بأن مكانة و دور المرأة في المجتمع اليمني القديم كانت متميزة قول يحتاج إلى أدلة و شواهد و هي موجودة في نقوش مكتشفة في مواقع الآثار اليمنية و هي موجودة أيضا في كتب التاريخ التي تعرضت لتاريخ الجزيرة العربية أو اليمن بصورة خاصة في فترة ما قبل الإسلام إلا أن هذا التميز النوعي الذي نقصده لا يعنى المبالغة في حجم مكانة المرأة و دورها في مختلف مراحل التاريخ اليمني القديم و لا يعنى أنها متساوية الدور و المكانة في كل القبائل اليمنية أو الممالك و الدول و الدويلات المتعاقبة و إنما يعني هذا التميز النوعي أنها أي المرأة كانت في بعض الفترات أحسن حالة منها في جنوب الجزيرة العربية و قد تحدث ا.ف.ل. بيستون : في بحث نشرة عن المرأة في مملكة سبأ : و هو يتحدث عن ظاهرة الوأد في بعض القبائل العربية و أن أسبابة تكون إما من الفقر أو من خوفهم من سبيها في الحروب و ليس لأنهن كارثة في المجتمع الرجالي و أكد البحث أن وأد البنات لم يكن عاماً و شاملاً في كل القبائل اليمنية و قد بينت لنا النقوش الدور الذي تقلدته المرأة في عهدها سواء الإجتماعي أو الديني أو السياسي حيث تشير النقوش التي قدمت من قبل النساء أنفسهن و هي نقوش تتعلق بأمور دينية أو دنيوية كنقوش النذور و نقوش الخطيئة و التكفير و نقوش البناء و نقوش الصيد و إلى جانب ذلك دونت أسماؤهن على التماثيل و اللوحات الجنائزية و شواهد القبور .

Continue reading مكانة المرأة اليمنية العظيمة في اليمن القديم

AIYS Blog