Category Archives: Hadramawt

AIYS Yemeni Fellowships 2018

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The AIYS organized a seminar In Ṣan‘ā’ on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 for the recipients of AIYS Fellowships granted for 2018.  Twelve researchers in different fields received an AIYS Yemeni Fellowship this year. Several researchers and academics attended the seminar in which nine researchers made brief presentation about their proposed researches.

These researchers are:

(1) Dr  Rajha Saad, an  assistant professor in the Library Section at Ṣan‘ā’ University. Her research topic is: “Information Literacy for Displaced People by War in Yemen: A Pilot Study.”

(2) Dr Khaled Naji, an associate professor of Biochemistry, Chemistry department, Faculty of Science, Ṣan‘ā’ University. His research topic is: “Preventive Effects of Wild Yemeni Monolluma quadrangula Extract on Oxidative Stress associated with Diabetes mellitus in Albino Male Rats.”

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(3) Taha Arrahomi, whose research is: “Role of Monetary Authority in Controlling Money Laundry in Republic of Yemen.”

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Travels to Aden and Mocha in the mid 19th Century, #1

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The good ship Belisarius was launched in October 1794. She measured only ninety-four and one half feet in length with a breadth of only twenty-five feet. She carried most valuable cargoes and paid duties on them ranging from fifteen to twenty-one thousand dollars. After successful voyaging in the India trade for eight years, the beautiful ship Belisarius went to pieces in a gale in the Bay of Tunis in April 1810, the crew and cargo saved. Source

During the 19th century there were many sail ships that engaged in trade, not to mention military expeditions, on the Arabian coast. One of the most interesting accounts was penned by Joseph B. F. Osgood (1823-1913), the son of a sea captain. In 1854 he published his travel account entitled Notes of Travel or Recollections of Majunga, Zanzibar, Muscat, Aden, Mocha, and other Eastern Ports (Salem: George Creamer). Setting out from Salem, Massachusetts, he reached the port of Majunga on the northwestern corner of Madagascar in 93 days. As an American Ibn Baṭūṭṭa, he provides a detailed and entertaining guide to the peoples and places he visited. From Majunga he sailed up the African coast to Zanzibar and then on the Zanzibar ruler’s ship “Curlew” to Muscat, where he arrived in 14 days after a trek on rough seas.

His colorful description of the coast between Oman and Aden is as follows;
[p. 118] “Our vessel was twelve days making an average passage along the east and south coast of Arabia from Muscat to Aden. Between these ports almost the entire line of sea coast is very barren, and sparsely inhabited by nomadic tribes of Arabs, who have no intercourse with civilized nations. The tribes living nearest to the sea-board are miserably poor and obtain their principal subsistence from the neighboring fishing grounds. None of them have good boats, and such of them as are not too lazy to work make use of the best floats which their ingenuity may devise. The Jenabi tribe, who occupy a desert line of coast between Suakirah and Kashaim, venture out to sea seated on inflated skins, which they manage very skillfully in heavy surfs, such as no boat could live in. While fishing for sharks they fearlessly expose their legs in the water, yet the greedy monsters do not molest them.

The people of Morebat, farther down the coast, have [p. 119] no boats or rafts of any kind. The same may be said of the few inhabitants of Hullaniyah, a small island about twenty miles in circumference belonging to the Curia Maria group, and the only one of that group that is inhabited. The want of boats is seriously felt, as these lone islanders are forced to depend for their daily subsistence chiefly upon the crabs and shell fish they are able to gather, and the fish they catch from the rocks. Captain Haines, I. N., visited this island in 1835, and found its poor and inoffensive population to consist of only seven families, amounting in all to twenty-three souls. One birth and one death was calculated upon annually. They had no idea from what part of the coast they originally came, and though they professed Mahometanism, but one of them could say his prayers. They lived in small huts built of loose stones, and covered with seaweed.

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Philby in the Hadramawt

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The British traveler H. St. J. Philby is best known for his writings on Saudi Arabia, but he also visited the Hadramawt in the late 1930s, driving down from Najrān through the eastern extent of the Empty Quarter to Shabwa and then into the Ḥaḍramawt. It is a chatty text like an extended diary, with names of people met and places visited, including archaeological ruins with inscriptions.  Philby has his bias, as is evident throughout, but the photographs are good documentation of life at the time.

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Traveling in War-torn Yemen

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The traveler Stephen Gollan recently traveled to Yemen, despite the conflict there, and has provided a number of nice photographs about his trip. It is well worth perusing.

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Here is how his article starts:

“What brings a traveler to places like this? Is it the desire to be so far from other travelers and achieve an authentic experience, or is it the thrill of stepping into the forbidden and unknown corners of the world?

When it comes to Yemen, I found my attraction drawn from its plethora of historical sights and its splendid natural beauty. But if I am to be one hundred percent honest with you the tremendous lure in coming to conflict areas like Yemen are the people. Yemen’s people are unlike anywhere I have ever been. Their hospitality is contagious, they smile even when there are airstrikes happening blocks away and no matter who you are, or what you believe in, they will be your lifelong friend.

This is what makes all the pain, all the danger, and all of the after effects worthwhile in venturing into finding the truth for yourself. This is Yemen, true Arabia.”

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The South in the Yemeni Conflict Panel

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At the upcoming annual MESA conference in Washington, D.C., AIYS is sponsoring two panels on Yemen. The second panel is entitled “The South in the Yemeni Conflict” (P4744) and was organized by Charles Schmitz. This will take place Sunday, 11/19/17 at 10:30am. [For details on the first panel, click here.]

The panelists include:

Noel Brehony ( Menas Associates  )
“Regionalism and nationalism in South Yemen”
•  Elisabeth Kendall ( Oxford University )
“What Does Eastern Yemen Want and What Is It Doing About It? The Voice of al-Mahra”
•   Thanos Petouris (Independent Scholar)
“Southern Yemen after the Saudi Intervention: Political and Social Change”
•   Charles P. Schmitz (Towson University)
“Salafism in the South”

Here is the Panel Abstract:

This panel will explore the new political and social developments in the south in order to chart the possible contours of the new southern Yemeni landscape.  In 2007 the Hirak, or southern movement, emerged with a clear political agenda for political autonomy but without a coherent leadership. In 2012 following the fall of the Saleh regime, Hadi’s transitional government installed southerners in key leadership positions in Yemen’s government, but most southerners remained very wary of Hadi’s government and largely boycotted the National Dialogue Conference that created the proposed federal Yemeni state.

The Houthi coup in late 2014 and the military onslaught of the Houthi Saleh forces on Aden in the spring of 2015 dramatically transformed the southern political landscape. The emergence of the southern resistance brought new leaders to the fore, the Emirati reconstruction of the southern security apparatus is building the foundations of new leadership in the governorates, and the Hadi government in Aden is vying for legitimacy in the south for the national government. These developments have dramatically transformed the southern political landscape in yet unknown ways. The panel aims to clarify some of these new developments in the south.

Yemen Architecture Exhibition

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Trevor Marchand has put together an exhibition entitled “Buildings That Fill My Eye” Architectural Heritage of Yemen for the Brunei Gallery at SOAS in London.

The exhibition and its planned public talks and educational events will explore the astonishing variety of building styles and traditions that have evolved over millennia in a region of diverse terrains, extreme climates and distinctive local histories. Generations of highly skilled masons, carpenters and craftspeople have deftly employed the materials-to-hand and indigenous technologies to create urban architectural assemblages, gardens and rural landscapes that dialogue harmoniously with the natural contours and conditions of southern Arabia. In turn, the place-making practices of Yemen’s builders have played a significant role in fostering tight-knit communities with a strong sense of pride and distinct cultural identities.

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