Category Archives: Politics

Sheila Carapico on Yemen

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Professor Sheila Carapico, widely recognized as a leading expert on Yemen, spoke about the country’s current political crisis at the 9/11 Memorial Museum on Monday.

Engaging in a discussion with Clifford Chanin, executive vice president and deputy director for museum programs, Carapico explained the current drivers of Yemen’s ongoing civil war and the history of Saudi influence in Yemen.

In the clip below, Carapico locates the Yemeni Civil War within the broader Middle East:

“The kingdoms of the Arabian Peninsula, they were worried about the uprising in Tunisia. They were worried about Egypt, they were worried about Libya, they were worried about Syria… They were panicked about Yemen. It’s right there, it’s so close and it’s half the indigenous population of the whole region.”

Abdullah Al-Mojahid: Genius Painter and Master of Caricature

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Abdullah Mohammed Al-Mojahid is one of the most influential cartoonists and creative painters in Yemen. Al-Mojahid distinguished himself as a pioneering cartoonist and a professional painter. His original talent and professional training had significantly helped him to make his way in the caricature profession in Yemen. “Al-Mojahid had been one of the most important Yemeni cartoonists”, said the Yemeni Minister of Information, Mua’mar Al-Iryani, in a statement issued on his death.

The much-respected artist Abdullah Ahmed Al-Mojahid was born in Taiz in 1950 and  died on September 1, 2017, in the capital Sanaa.

He has been a prolific artist, effectively contributing toward promoting the fine arts and caricature in Yemen. He produced dozens of artistic works through his professional career which spanned more than three decades. Due to his originality and ingenuity as a painter, Al-Mojahid established himself as a famous name both in Yemen and other parts of the Arab world. As a result, in 2013 he participated as a representative of Arab Painters in the International Exhibition for Paintings, organized by the Chinese Ministry of Culture for the Painters. His artistic works and paintings were displayed in various artistic and cultural venues and exhibitions. For example, he organized two exhibitions in Damascus, Syria, in 1980 and 1982.

Al-Mojahid studied Fine Arts in Damascus and started his artistic career as a professional cartoonist in Left-oriented Yemeni newspapers.  He was well known in the caricature profession as Abu Suhail. His artistic works included dozens of paintings, drawings and portraits described as of the finest quality. His most famous caricature is entitled Qurūd Abū Suhayl (Abū Suhayl’s Monkeys), published in 1994 by Al-Thawri Newspaper, the mouthpiece of the Yemeni Socialist Party (YSP).

Salwa Dammaj

Yemeni Refugees in Djibouti

The Gate Of Tears Yemeni refugees, camp of Markazi. Obock, Djibouti, Decembre, 2016 http://nyuad.nyu.edu/en/research/faculty-research/akkasah.html
The Gate Of Tears: Yemeni refugees, camp of Markazi. Obock, Djibouti, December, 2016; photograph by Nadia Benchallal

At the upcoming MESA meeting in Washington, D.C., Dr. Nathalie Peutz (Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Arab Crossroads Studies Program, New York University Abu Dhabi) will be presenting a talk on her research among Yemeni refugees in Djibouti. This is entitled “Becoming Permanent Refugees: Yemenis in the Horn of Africa.” Her talk will be at the AIYS Business meeting, Sunday, November 19, 4-5pm, in Park Tower Suite 8216 (L). This talk is not on the official program, so please spread the word.

The conflict in Yemen has precipitated what many consider to be the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. Yet, despite the raging cholera epidemic, widespread hunger, and unprecedented displacement within Yemen, there have been fewer than 100,000 registered arrivals of Yemeni citizens and foreign nationals in the Horn of Africa since the start of the war. Today, roughly 1,000 of these refugees reside in Djibouti’s Markazi camp, where they are now being treated as “permanent refugees.” Who lives in the camp? Why did these particular families and individuals leave Yemen, and what are their hopes for a durable solution? This informal talk will provide an overview of the current situation of Yemeni refugees in the Horn of Africa and of how various aid regimes are constructing their future.

Yemen photos by Giles Clark

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23 April 2017. A boy in the ruins of his school in Sa‘da City, North Yemen. According to UNICEF, here are currently over 3 million + children in Yemen who unable to attend school as the war enters a third year of conflict.

The photographer Giles Clark has uploaded a series of superb photos taken in Yemen during a trip with the United Nations OCHA team in April/May, 2017. Here are two samples.

Check it out here.

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24 April 2017. Children stand in the ruins of damaged traditional mud adobe building in a small town a few kilometers south of Sa‘da City.

New Book on Yemen and the Gulf States

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This book has just been published by Gerlach Press:

YEMEN AND THE GULF STATES: THE MAKING OF A CRISIS
Edited by Helen Lackner, Daniel Martin Varisco
Publisher: Gerlach Press, Berlin & London
Hardcover, 143 pages
ISBN: 978-3-959940-30-6
Publication date: October 2017
EUR 85 / GBP 80

More information on the title and the order form can be downloaded from here:

Title Information with TOC:
http://www.gerlach-books.de/attachment/INFO_GerlachPress_Lackner_Yemen_Sept2017.pdf

Order Form:
http://www.gerlach-books.de/attachment/Order_Form_Lackner_Yemen_Aug2017.pdf

September 26 Archive

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A trove of books in Arabic on Yemeni politics, especially about the 1962 revolution, is available for download online at https://26september.yemenarchive.com/

Here are the books available on the site:

 

كنت طبيبة في اليمن
كلودي فايان. تعريب وتقديم: محسن أحمد العيني

الجمهوريه بين السلطنة والقبيلة في اليمن الشمالي
أبو بكر السقاف

الرهينة
زيد مطيع دماج

الطريق إلى الحرية مذكرات
العزي صالح السنيدار

اليمن الجمهوري
عبدالله البردوني

اليمن الجنوبي الحياة السياسية من الاستعمار إلى الوحدة
علي الصراف

اليمن الجنوبي سياسيًا واقتصاديًا واجتماعيًا منذ 1937م وحتى قيام جمهورية اليمن الديمقراطية
محمد عمر الحبشي

اليمن الثورة والحرب حتى عام
1970
إدجار أوبلانس / ترجمة عبدالخالق ﻻشيد

اليمن تحت حكم الإمام أحمد 1948 –
1962
أحمد عبيد بن دغر

مذكرات أحمد محمد نعمان
علي محمد زيد

مذكرات الرئيس القاضي عبد الرحمن بن يحي الإرياني الجزء الثاني
عبد الرحمن بن يحي الإرياني

مغامرات مصري في مجاهل اليمن
مصطفى الشكعة

نظرة في بعض قضايا الثورة اليمنية
محمد علي الشهاري

ثورة اليمن الدستورية
مجموعة من ضباط ثورة

تاريخ اليمن المعاصر
مجموعة من المؤلفون السوفيت. الترجمة: محمد علي البحر

طائر الخراب
حبيب عبدالرب سروري

أيام وذكريات
حسن محمد مكي

يوم ولد اليمن مجده ذكريات عن ثورة 26 سبتمبر 1962
عبد الغني مطهر

 

 

The South in the Yemeni Conflict Panel

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At the upcoming annual MESA conference in Washington, D.C., AIYS is sponsoring two panels on Yemen. The second panel is entitled “The South in the Yemeni Conflict” (P4744) and was organized by Charles Schmitz. This will take place Sunday, 11/19/17 at 10:30am. [For details on the first panel, click here.]

The panelists include:

Noel Brehony ( Menas Associates  )
“Regionalism and nationalism in South Yemen”
•  Elisabeth Kendall ( Oxford University )
“What Does Eastern Yemen Want and What Is It Doing About It? The Voice of al-Mahra”
•   Thanos Petouris (Independent Scholar)
“Southern Yemen after the Saudi Intervention: Political and Social Change”
•   Charles P. Schmitz (Towson University)
“Salafism in the South”

Here is the Panel Abstract:

This panel will explore the new political and social developments in the south in order to chart the possible contours of the new southern Yemeni landscape.  In 2007 the Hirak, or southern movement, emerged with a clear political agenda for political autonomy but without a coherent leadership. In 2012 following the fall of the Saleh regime, Hadi’s transitional government installed southerners in key leadership positions in Yemen’s government, but most southerners remained very wary of Hadi’s government and largely boycotted the National Dialogue Conference that created the proposed federal Yemeni state.

The Houthi coup in late 2014 and the military onslaught of the Houthi Saleh forces on Aden in the spring of 2015 dramatically transformed the southern political landscape. The emergence of the southern resistance brought new leaders to the fore, the Emirati reconstruction of the southern security apparatus is building the foundations of new leadership in the governorates, and the Hadi government in Aden is vying for legitimacy in the south for the national government. These developments have dramatically transformed the southern political landscape in yet unknown ways. The panel aims to clarify some of these new developments in the south.

AIYS at MESA 2017

crisismesa

At the upcoming annual MESA conference in Washington, D.C., AIYS is sponsoring two panels on Yemen.  The first is a roundtable entitled “Updating the Yemen Crisis” (RS4740 on the program at  Monday, 11/20/17, 3:30pm ). For details on the second panel, click here.

Participants include:

• Nadwa Aldawsari  ((Project on Middle East Democracy)
• H.E. Amat al-Alim Alsoswa  (Former Minister of Human Rights, Yemen)
• Sheila Carapico  (University of Richmond)
• Walid Mahdi (University of Oklahoma)
• Daniel Martin Varisco (President, AIYS)

Here is the abstract of the panel:

Of all the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, one of the least reported in the media is the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Yemen.  This forum brings together five experts who work on Yemen to discuss the current state of the conflict in Yemen, changes in the shifting alliances and prospects for cessation of hostilities. These experts come from the disciplines of Anthropology, Political Science and American Studies, as well as a former senior Yemeni diplomat. The goal is to provide an update on the current state of the civil strife in Yemen by the time of the annual meeting. The turmoil in Yemen is part of a wider regional struggle that has pitted Sunni vs. Shi’a groups in a political battle for influence and dominance. Following the “Arab Spring” revolution in Yemen that led to the removal of Ali Abdullah Salih after three decades of power, a failed National Dialogue Conference failed to reconcile political differences. The expulsion of interim President Hadi by the Huthi/Salih forces led to a protracted bombing campaign by a Saudi-led coalition after March, 2015. Yemen, unified as a state in 1990, has been split apart by competing sectarian factions, with a Huthi/Salih alliance in the north, anti-Huthi Saudi-backed forces in the south around Aden and cells of Ansar Shariah (al-Qaida) and ISIS in the east.

Despite international efforts brokered by the United Nations to resolve the conflict, there has been no viable resolution to the conflict by the start of 2017.  Many experts consider the conflict an unwinnable war, yet it drags on. The extent of destruction, primarily from the bombing campaign and blockade, has affected the entire population.  Over 10,000 thousand civilians, including many women and children, have been killed, in addition to an unknown number of combatants.  In January, 2017, the UN Humanitarian director of OCHA noted that every ten minutes a Yemeni child died of preventable causes.  Hospitals and clinics, even those maintained by Medecins sans frontieres, have been bombed, as well as many factories, mosques and heritage monuments. Massive unemployment has created a potential pool for the different armed groups fighting each other for power. The roundtable is intended not only to update information on the situation but also to stimulate research by scholars in multiple disciplines on one of the major humanitarian crises in the Middle East.

Aden Hinterland Freed!

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A picturesque ceremony took place recently at Lahej, the capital of the Aden hinterland, on the occasion of the restoration to his throne, under British auspices, of the Sultan, Sir Abdul Karim ibn Fadthli ibn Ali, K.C.I.E.  He succeeded to the throne on January 1, 1918, and was recognized as Sultan by the British Government, but it was only lately that he was installed after the evacuation of Lahej by the Turks.  There were some 7000 Turkish troops in the Aden hinterland and southern Yemen, and for some time after the armistice granted to Turkey, it is said they refused to evacuate those territories, believing the news to be a hoax.  Special envoys had to be sent from Constantinople to convince them, and they have since surrendered and have been shipped out of the country.

from The Illustrated London News, March 1, 1919– 293.

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