Category Archives: Food

National Geographic in Yemen

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The online website of National Geographic has recently uploaded an article about the Yemeni photographer Amira Al-Sharif, written by Erin Blakemore. The article describes the level of suffering in the current humanitarian crisis, as illustrated in the images. “But Al-Sharif is uninterested in highlighting those facets of Yemeni life. She prefers her photographs of Yemenis going about their business, children at school and at play, women living and loving, flowers blooming. She captures the light in Yemen that stubbornly persists in the shadows of war.”

You can see her amazing photographs on Instagram.

All about Aden

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One of the most impressive Yemeni sites for the culture and history of Aden and southern Yemen is alamree.net. You can literally spend hours exploring this rich site. As you can see in the above image from the main page, there is information on Aden itself, coffee and mountains in Yāfi‘ the Aden zoo and the mosque of al-‘Aydarūs. There is also a treasure trove of images and photographs on Aden, some of which are very old. More photographs and videos are also available on the Facebook site of Hussain Alamree.

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Tawāhī in the 1960s

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Ma‘alā sūq, 1920

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Local dance in Shaykh ‘Uthmān, 1947

مطعم بالو في عدن

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من معالم عدن:
مطعم بالو: يقع في كريتر بالقرب من الميدان في بداية الشارع المؤدي إلى مسجد حسين الأهدل بحافة حسين ، وهو متخصص ببيع الكباب.
فتح الحاج محمد بالو المطعم في عام 1926، بعد قدومه إلى عدن مع كثيرين من الهند وقد كان بائعاً على الرصيف للكباب في الهند، ومنحته السلطة المحلية رخصة دكانه الصغير بالقرب من مقهى «زكو»، وبعد وفاته شغل المطعم ولده ياسين، وعجينة الكباب تُحظر في بيت صاحب المطعم التي تحتفظ بسر خلطة كباب بالو المميز.
والأن يدير الشيف نجيب ياسين محمد بالو المطعم الذي أشتهر واصبح من معالم عدن التاريخية وعلى العدنيين الطيبين ومحبي عدن تكريم هذا المطعم بما هو أهل له هو ومكتبة الحاج عبادي.

من فاسبوك محمد جرهوم

Rasulid Seminar in Bonn

mahoneyrasulidDan Mahoney opening the Rasulid Seminar in Bonn

On Friday, May 29, a seminar on Rasulid studies was held in Bonn, Germany at the Annemarie Schimmel Kolleg. Funding for the seminar was provided by the Fritz Thyssen Stiftung and the Kolleg. Papers were presented by Ingrid Hehmeyer, Ellen Kenney, Dan Mahoney, Magdalena Moorthy-Kloss and Dan Varisco. Preparations are underway to publish the papers.

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AIYS President Dan Varisco presented at the seminar

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Seminar dinner at Em Höttche in Bonn
(left: Ellen Kenney, Roxani Margariti, Ingrid Hehmeyer, Dan Varisco, Zacharie de Pierrepont; right: Dan Mahoney, Petra Schmidl (partially hidden), Magdalena Moorthy-Kloss, Adam Sabra)

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Dan Mahoney, Petra Schmidl, Magdalena Moorthy-Kloss,
Adam Sabra

A Boy’s View of Mocha Coffee

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Trolling through archive.org can yield surprising and very obscure finds. Such is the case for this Orientalist book by Daniel Wise from 1885. The author has written it for boys (not sure if girls were on his mind) about a trip that a boy could make from Boston to Baghdad and back again. The author splices information from various travel accounts into his fanciful narrative, which has a missionary side as well.

What I found of interest was a brief discussion of coffee, probably taken from Niebuhr’s late 18th century travels.  There is nothing new here, but the style is fun to consider. It is interesting to note that even back then it seems that not all Mocha coffee was coming from Mocha.

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Film on Yemen Coffeehouses

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The Yemeni filmmaker Zakaria Mohammed has recently produced a short film on Yemeni coffeehouses, described on the website al-madaniya and also available on Youtube.

Cafes is a short documentary about Samaser, the old and modern cafes in Sana’a. The film chronicles these spaces in a beautiful and artistic way, and weaves their history, development and social role for the elderly and youth alike. In his film, Zakaria Mohammed focuses on the social and cultural importance of cafes for young men and women who have turned to them because of today’s war and crisis – especially as the country lacks safe spaces and suffers from a decline in leisure and recreational spaces. In addition, they value the facilities and services that these cafes are able to offer, against a background of collapsing public services across the country. Electricity and an Internet connection are among the main services that cafes provide, and that many people across the country have been unable to access at home. In his story, Zakaria oscillates poetically between the past and the present. Through a series of clips he conveys the suffering of his generation to the world, and highlights the ways in which youth resist the circumstances of war and escape their painful reality.

Continue reading here.