AIYS at MESA

AIYS held two well-attended panels at MESA in Boston last week.  Here are some of the photos from the panel organized by Dan Mahoney on the destruction of Yemen’s cultural heritage:

mesapanel1
Dr. Lamya Khalidi, Dr. Krista Lewis and Dr. Dan Mahoney at MESA

mac
Dr. McGuire Gibson at the heritage panel.  Dr. Gibson was the founder of AIYS in 1978.

lamya1
Dr. Lamya Khalidi, who also provided a video of Dr. al-Sayani, the current Director of the General Organization of Antiquities  and Museums in Yemen.

And here are photos from the panel organized by Dr. Marieke Brandt:

Continue reading AIYS at MESA

New Book: Arabia Incognita

In 2011, millions of Yemenis calling themselves the Peaceful Youth joyfully joined the “Arab Spring.” Four years later, popular aspirations for social justice and a serious attempt at national dialogue were thwarted by deadly domestic power struggles. When the pro-Saudi, US-supported government fled to Riyadh in April 2015, the Kingdom led a multinational military intervention inside Yemen. By December, daily bombardment had killed thousands of fighters and civilians, injured and displaced hundreds of thousands, and decimated homes and infrastructure. A naval blockade cut off access to fuel, medicine, and food for millions. In addition to this humanitarian catastrophe, the ensuing chaos emboldened al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and led the group ISIS to expand there.

Perfect for understanding the political economy, geopolitics and social relations of the region.Prof. Laleh Khalili, University of London, SOAS

Arabia Incognita helps readers understand this tragic misadventure by tracing the Arabian Peninsula’s modern history from Yemen’s strong anti-imperial movement of the 1960s through the present series of conflicts. The majority of the essays focus on Yemen’s colorful and complex internal socio-political dynamics; others draw attention to parallel, often inter-connected disharmonies inside the Gulf’s petro-kingdoms; wider regional upheavals and movements; and America’s deep, vast and very problematic security involvement in the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula.

Contents:

Continue reading New Book: Arabia Incognita

Scenes of Yemen

selling
Photograph by Maarten de Wolf

I am walking through Sana’a and can’t believe my eyes.
Does this still exist – lots of men in white dresses wearing daggers?”

In 2013 the photographer Maartin de Wolf published online a superb set of photographs about Yemen, highlighting the variety of dress old and new. Amidst the current destruction of all almost aspects of daily life in Yemen, it is good to remember the beauty of Yemen and its people. Check out the photographs for yourself.

Yemeni citing of 1006 CE Supernova

Interpretation of the historic Yemeni reports of supernova SN 1006: early discovery in mid-April 1006 ?

Ralph Neuhaeuser (U Jena), Dagmar Neuhaeuser, Wafiq Rada (Hila), Jesse Chapman (U Stanford), Daniela Luge (U Jena), Paul Kunitzsch (U Munich)

The recently published Yemeni observing report about SN 1006 from al-Yamani clearly gives AD 1006 Apr 17±2 (mid-Rajab 396h) as first observation date. Since this is about 1.5 weeks earlier than the otherwise earliest reports (Apr 28 or 30) as discussed so far, we were motivated to investigate an early sighting in more depth. We searched for additional evidences from other areas like East Asia and Europe. We found that the date given by al-Yamani is fully consistent with other evidence, including: (a) SN 1006 “rose several times half an hour after sunset” (al-Yamani), which is correct for the location of Sana in Yemen for the time around Apr 17, but it would not be correct for late Apr or early May; (b) the date (3rd year, 3rd lunar month, 28th day wuzi, Ichidai Yoki) for an observation of a guest star in Japan is inconsistent (there is no day wuzi in that lunar month), but may be dated to Apr 16 by reading wuwu date rather than a wuzi date; (c) there is observational evidence that SN 1006 was observed in East Asia early or mid April; for the second half of April, a bad weather (early monsoon) period is not unlikely — there is a lack of night reports; (d) the observer in St. Gallen reported to have seen SN 1006 “for three months”, which must have ended at the very latest on AD 1006 Jul 10, given his northern location, so that his observations probably started in April. We conclude that the correctly reported details give quite high confidence in the fully self-consistent report of al-Yamani, so that the early discovery date should be considered seriously.

Comments: 11 pages, 2 figures, 1 table (in press) in Astronomical Notes 2016
Subjects: History and Philosophy of Physics (physics.hist-ph); Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)
Cite as: arXiv:1607.02915 [physics.hist-ph]
(or arXiv:1607.02915v1 [physics.hist-ph] for this version)